Call: + 1 (305) 913 1337 | info@navisyachts.com

Vendée Globe, day 42 - Catch Him If You (Le) Cam

29/12/2012
Rate this item
(0 votes)

Mike Golding (Gamesa) faces a race this morning not to get entangled in the bubble of high pressure south of Tasmania and watch Jean Le Cam(SynerCiel) sail away.

 Golding was not alone in scratching his head as to why Le Cam dived south 36 hours ago. It may be clearer this morning, but in his morning message Golding, who averaged 15 knots to Le Cam's 16.knots in 18-20 knots of NW wind, was confident he would also escape with Le Cam.

"The stronger stuff is about 100 miles away and I should get a good push from that for a while," Golding wrote on Saturday morning. "The only determination just now is to get to that wind. Jean Le Cam will get there before me but in turn I don't think the guys behind are going to get it and we should just get away a bit from them.

"But in general I feel I should be going quick so it has been disappointing. I am struggling to find speed at the moment on the boats ahead. Long term there is nothing really bearing down on us to give us a real shove. But, equally, if you look to the south neither has there been anything going past that you think 'well if we were south we might have had something' so it is all a bit frustrating to be where we are."

Le Cam, 1,755 miles behind the leaders, passed the East Australia gate yesterday evening and is best placed to catch the strong more northerly wind ahead of them. Golding is 195 miles and about ten hours behind him.Dominique Wavre (Mirabaud) is south of Golding but another 76 miles behind.

Javier Sansó (Acciona 100% EcoPowered), in ninth, 364 miles behind Le Cam, is also the furthest north and perhaps the most vulnerable. Sansó, the fastest skipper in the last ten days apart from the two leaders. For once coming from behind may not be the advantage for him, as it has been twice in the race so far during his magnificent comebacks.

"It is going to be interesting to see which side is the best to get through this small wind-less transition ahead of us," Sansó wrote on Friday night, "before we get onto the back of a growing squall which will take us directly down south and into the Pacific....but well...."

"It is honestly quite difficult to know what is going to happen, since sometimes the calms will appear more to the south or more to the north, and in these cases it is usually more beneficial for those coming up from behind since those in front come to a standstill. But sometimes those who get there first will get through to the other side before the others. In 40 hours or so we will see what happens."

Last modified on Wednesday, 02 January 2013 15:38

Subscribe to NAVIS Magazine "Digital" edition.

NAVIS subscripcion for ipad

Now just $10

NAVIS Luxury Yacht Magazine Digital, all NAVIS in an ultra high definition for iPad and iPhone. FREE app download and 50% discount on all digital subscription for iOS devices.

Get it now!